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Conversation about website

English BestWebIt course

April 2016

Page list

  1. What is it mean "website"?
  2. How does website work?
  3. Static and interactive website
  4. Web development
  5. Web development tools?
  6. What is a Website Builder?
  7. Integrated development environment (IDE)
  8. Designing Your Website
  9. Building Your Website
  10. Test Driving Your Website and Going Live
  11. Website Considerations
  12. Tip
  13. About web

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  18. How create a web-site?
  19. Computer Programmer Job Description
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  21. Translate into English
what is web site

Theme text. What is it mean "website" and etc?

1. What is it mean "website"?

A website, also written as web site, or simply site, is a set of related web pages typically served from a single web domain. A website is hosted on at least one web server, accessible via a network such as the Internet or a private local area network through an Internet address known as a uniform resource locator (URL). All publicly accessible websites collectively constitute the World Wide Web.

Web pages, which are the building blocks of websites, are documents, typically written in plain text interspersed with formatting instructions of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML, XHTML). They may incorporate elements from other websites with suitable markup anchors. Webpages are accessed and transported with the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), which may optionally employ encryption (HTTP Secure, HTTPS) to provide security and privacy for the user of the webpage content. The user's application, often a web browser, renders the page content according to its HTML markup instructions onto a display terminal.

The pages of a website can usually be accessed from a simple Uniform Resource Locator (URL) called the web address. The URLs of the pages organize them into a hierarchy, although hyperlinking between them conveys the reader's perceived site structure and guides the reader's navigation of the site which generally includes a home page with most of the links to the site's web content, and a supplementary about, contact and link page.

Some websites require a subscription to access some or all of their content. Examples of subscription websites include many business sites, parts of news websites, academic journal websites, gaming websites, file-sharing websites, message boards, web-based email, social networking websites, websites providing real-time stock market data, and websites providing various other services (e.g., websites offering storing and/or sharing of images, files and so forth).

2. How does website work?

Websites have many functions and can be used in various fashions; a website can be a personal website, a commercial website, a government website or a non-profit organization website. Websites can be the work of an individual, a business or other organization, and are typically dedicated to a particular topic or purpose. Any website can contain a hyperlink to any other website, so the distinction between individual sites, as perceived by the user, can be blurred.

Websites are written in, or converted to, HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) and are accessed using a software interface classified as a user agent. Web pages can be viewed or otherwise accessed from a range of computer-based and Internet-enabled devices of various sizes, including desktop computers, laptops, PDAs and cell phones.

A website is hosted on a computer system known as a web server, also called an HTTP server. These terms can also refer to the software that runs on these systems which retrieves and delivers the web pages in response to requests from the website's users. Apache is the most commonly used web server software (according to Netcraft statistics) and Microsoft's IIS is also commonly used. Some alternatives, such as Nginx, Lighttpd, Hiawatha or Cherokee, are fully functional and lightweight.

3. Static and interactive website

Websites can be divided into two broad categories - static and interactive. Interactive sites are part of the Web 2.0 community of sites, and allow for interactivity between the site owner and site visitors. Static sites serve or capture information but do not allow engagement with the audience directly.

Static website

A static website is one that has web pages stored on the server in the format that is sent to a client web browser. It is primarily coded in Hypertext Markup Language (HTML); Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) are used to control appearance beyond basic HTML. Images are commonly used to effect the desired appearance and as part of the main content. Audio or video might also be considered "static" content if it plays automatically or is generally non-interactive.

This type of website usually displays the same information to all visitors. Similar to handing out a printed brochure to customers or clients, a static website will generally provide consistent, standard information for an extended period of time. Although the website owner may make updates periodically, it is a manual process to edit the text, photos and other content and may require basic website design skills and software. Simple forms or marketing examples of websites, such as classic website, a five-page website or a brochure website are often static websites, because they present pre-defined, static information to the user. This may include information about a company and its products and services through text, photos, animations, audio/video, and navigation menus.

Static web sites can be edited using four broad categories of software:
-Text editors, such as Notepad or TextEdit, where content and HTML markup are manipulated directly within the editor program
-WYSIWYG offline editors, such as Microsoft FrontPage and Adobe Dreamweaver (previously Macromedia Dreamweaver), with which the site is edited using a GUI and the final HTML markup is generated automatically by the editor software WYSIWYG online editors which create media rich online presentation like web pages, widgets, intro, blogs, and other documents.
-Template-based editors such as iWeb allow users to create and upload web pages to a web server without detailed HTML knowledge, as they pick a suitable template from a palette and add pictures and text to it in a desktop publishing fashion without -direct manipulation of HTML code.

Static websites may still use server side includes (SSI) as an editing convenience, such as sharing a common menu bar across many pages. As the site's behaviour to the reader is still static, this is not considered a dynamic site.

4. Dynamic website

A dynamic website is one that changes or customizes itself frequently and automatically.

Server-side dynamic pages are generated "on the fly" by computer code that produces the HTML (CSS are responsible for appearance and thus, are static files). There are a wide range of software systems, such as CGI, Java Servlets and Java Server Pages (JSP), Active Server Pages and ColdFusion (CFML) that are available to generate dynamic web systems and dynamic sites. Various web application frameworks and web template systems are available for general-use programming languages like PHP, Perl, Python, and Ruby, to make it faster and easier to create complex dynamic web sites.

A site can display the current state of a dialogue between users, monitor a changing situation, or provide information in some way personalized to the requirements of the individual user. For example, when the front page of a news site is requested, the code running on the web server might combine stored HTML fragments with news stores retrieved from a database or another web site via RSS to produce a page that includes the latest information. Dynamic sites can be interactive by using HTML forms, storing and reading back browser cookies, or by creating a series of pages that reflect the previous history of clicks. Another example of dynamic content is when a retail website with a database of media products allows a user to input a search request, e.g. for the keyword Beatles. In response, the content of the web page will spontaneously change the way it looked before, and will then display a list of Beatles products like CDs, DVDs and books.

Dynamic HTML uses JavaScript code to instruct the web browser how to interactively modify the page contents.

One way to simulate a certain type of dynamic web site while avoiding the performance loss of initiating the dynamic engine on a per-user or per-connection basis, is to periodically automatically regenerate a large series of static pages.

5. Web development

Web development is a broad term for the work involved in developing a web site for the Internet (World Wide Web) or an intranet (a private network). Web development can range from developing the simplest static single page of plain text to the most complex web-based internet applications, electronic businesses, and social network services. A more comprehensive list of tasks to which web development commonly refers, may include web design, web content development, client liaison, client-side/server-side scripting, web server and network security configuration, and e-commerce development. Among web professionals, "web development" usually refers to the main non-design aspects of building web sites: writing markup and coding. Most recently Web development has come to mean the creation of content management systems or CMS. These CMS can be made from scratch, proprietary (such as Open Text) or open source (such as Drupal). In broad terms the CMS acts as middleware between the database and the user through the browser. A principle benefit of a CMS is that it allows non-technical people to make changes to their Web site without having technical knowledge.

For larger organizations and businesses, web development teams can consist of hundreds of people (web developers) and follow standard methods like Agile methodologies while developing websites. Smaller organizations may only require a single permanent or contracting developer, or secondary assignment to related job positions such as a graphic designer and/or information systems technician. Web development may be a collaborative effort between departments rather than the domain of a designated department.

6. Web development tools

Web development tools allow web developers to test and debug their code. They are different from website builders and IDEs in that they do not assist in the direct creation of a webpage, rather they are tools used for testing the user facing interface of a website or web application.

Web development tools come as browser add-ons or built in features in web browsers. The most popular web browsers today like, Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer, and Safari have built in tools to help web developers, and many additional add-ons can be found in their respective plugin download centers.

Web development tools allow developers to work with a variety of web technologies, including HTML, CSS, the DOM, JavaScript, and other components that are handled by the web browser. Due to the increasing demand from web browsers to do more popular web browsers have included more features geared for developers.

The built-in web developer tools in the browser are commonly accessed by hovering over an item on a webpage and selecting the "Inspect Element" or similar option from the context menu. Alternatively the F12 key tends to be another common shortcut.

7. What is a Website Builder?

An online website builder, also known as a website builder, an online CMS or a web builder, is a special kind of content management system (CMS).

While traditional content management systems were designed to administer large websites, online website builders were designed with smaller website projects in mind.

This means the user doesn't require any special programming skills or other technical knowledge, such as knowing how to install a CMS, apply a template or create a database.

It's possible to create a fully functional web presence with an online website builder. Updating your website's text or adding new articles, images or multimedia content such as video or audio, is also easy via a user-friendly interface.

Modern online website builders follow the key CMS principle of maintaining strict separation between content and design. The advantage of this is that websites designed in this way are more easily indexed by search engines.

It also means that making changes to the website's design or templates is easy, and the content doesn't need to be modified in the process.

Who are website builders for?

These systems are particularly suited to individuals, freelancers, photographers, small businesses and start-ups with or without a web store.

Different types of website builders

Some website builders are entirely web-based and run on the provider's server. To work with these tools, all you need is a standard web browser such as Firefox or Google Chrome. Other website builders come as software packages that you download and install on your computer. Both options have their own advantages and disadvantages.

Advantages of online site builders:
- No need to install anything on your computer.
- You can work on your website from anywhere (also great for team projects!).
- No need to worry about updating software or accessing FTP servers.
- Website builder and web hosting are offered by the same provider.
- No need to purchase software.
- Many website builders offer packages that are completely free.

Advantages of offline site builders:
- You can still work on your website even if you’re offline.
- FTP server access offers greater flexibility.
- You are less dependent on your website builder service provider.

With internet access becoming increasingly fast and reliable, browser-based (i.e. web-based) website builders are becoming more and more popular.

8. Integrated development environment (IDE)

An integrated development environment (IDE) is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to computer programmers for software development. An IDE normally consists of a source code editor, build automation tools and a debugger. Most modern IDEs have an intelligent code completion.

Some IDEs contain a compiler, interpreter, or both, such as NetBeans and Eclipse; others do not, such as SharpDevelop and Lazarus. The boundary between an integrated development environment and other parts of the broader software development environment is not well-defined. Sometimes a version control system, or various tools to simplify the construction of a Graphical User Interface (GUI), are integrated. Many modern IDEs also have a class browser, an object browser, and a class hierarchy diagram, for use in object-oriented software development.

Integrated development environments are designed to maximize programmer productivity by providing tight-knit components with similar user interfaces. IDEs present a single program in which all development is done. This program typically provides many features for authoring, modifying, compiling, deploying and debugging software.

One aim of the IDE is to reduce the configuration necessary to piece together multiple development utilities, instead providing the same set of capabilities as a cohesive unit. Reducing that setup time can increase developer productivity, in cases where learning to use the IDE is faster than manually integrating all of the individual tools. Tighter integration of all development tasks has the potential to improve overall productivity beyond just helping with setup tasks. For example, code can be continuously parsed while it is being edited, providing instant feedback when syntax errors are introduced. That can speed learning a new programming language and its associated libraries.

Some IDEs are dedicated to a specific programming language, allowing a feature set that most closely matches the programming paradigms of the language. However, there are many multiple-language IDEs, such as Eclipse, ActiveState Komodo, IntelliJ IDEA, MyEclipse, Oracle JDeveloper, NetBeans, Codenvy and Microsoft Visual Studio. Xcode, Xojo and Delphi are dedicated to a closed language or set of programming languages.

While most modern IDEs are graphical, text-based IDEs such as Turbo Pascal were in popular use before the widespread availability of windowing systems like Microsoft Windows and the X Window System (X11). They commonly use function keys or hotkeys to execute frequently used commands or macros.

Building a website is a great way to share your ideas and thoughts with the world. But if you've never done one, it can seem daunting. There's all that http-dot-whatever and and and how do you get pictures and text in there? Well fear not, this article will help you to grasp the intricacies very quickly!

9. Designing Your Website

1. Get inspired. Look at websites with great designs and think about why they're great designs. It usually comes down to the information, resources, links, and pages being laid out in a way that is easy to see and use. To get ideas about how to design your own site, look at sites which do similar things to get ideas about where you should put different types of content. Stay realistic to your skills.

Ease of access is the most important thing. If you don't have a certain piece of information easily visible, make sure that getting to that information is very logical. Generally the simpler the design, the fewer the pages, the better.

2. Choose a topic and purpose. If you already have a fairly good idea about what your website will focus on, skip this step. If not, here are some things to help you figure that out. First, understand that there are billions of people on the Internet, and a large percentage have websites. If you limit yourself to something that hasn't been done, you'll never get started.

When you think, "Internet," what is the first thing that comes to your mind? E-commerce? Music? News? Socializing? Blogging? Those are all good places to start.

You could create a website that's dedicated to your favorite band, and have a chat area where people can talk about it.

You can build a page for your family, but be careful about things like this. The internet is full of unsavory characters and information you put up about your family could end up being used against you. Consider adding password protection to your personal family website.

If you're a news junkie, or want something less filtered than traditional media, build a website and get publicly available feeds from news providers such as Reuters, BBC, AP, and others. Build your own customized news aggregator (what used to go by the quaint name of "newspaper"), then see and show all the news that's fit to digitize.

If you're creative at writing then you can start a blog where you can write about anything you want and attract monthly readers!

3. Make a plan. Building your website is going to take a commitment of time and possibly money, so set a limit on both, and then dig in. The plan doesn't have to be a big, complicated spreadsheet, or a fancy graphic presentation, but at the very least, you will want to consider what it will do for you and the visitors, what you'll put on the website, what goes where on the webpages.

4. Gather the content. There are lots of different types of content and many have their own considerations. You'll need to figure out what's best for your website and your needs. Some things to consider including: A store. If you want to sell things, you'll need to figure out how you want the items to be available. If you have relatively few things to sell, you might want to consider having a store with a hosting service. Society6, Amazon, and Cafepress are all well-established store hosts which let you sell a variety of items and set your own prices.

- Media. Do you want to display videos? Music? Do you want to host your own files or do you want them hosted somewhere else? Youtube and SoundCloud are great examples of hosting options, but you'll need to be sure that the way you design your website allows these media types to display correctly.

- Images. Are you a photographer? An artist? If you plan on putting original images on your website, you might want to use a format that can help keep them from getting stolen. Make sure the images are relatively small or that they are hidden behind some Flash code, so as to keep them from being easily saveable.

- Widgets. These are mini-programs which run on your website, usually to help you keep track of who visits, what they're looking for, and where they're from. You can also find widgets for booking appointments, displaying a calendar, etc. Look into what might be useful for you (just make sure the widget comes from a reputable source).

- Contact information. Do you want to have contact information on your webpage? For your own safety, you should be careful about what kind of information you have available. You should never display things like your home address or home phone number, as information like this can be used to steal your identity. You may want to set up a PO box or a special email address for people to contact you at, if you don't have a business address.

5. Draw a flow chart. For most people, the website starts on the home page. This is the page that everybody sees when they first go to www.yourSite.com. But where do they go from there? If you spend some time thinking about how people might interact with your site, you'll have a much easier time down the line when you are making navigation buttons and links.

6. Plan for user devices and situations. In recent years, smartphones and tablets have become incredibly popular platforms for browsing the internet, and they require websites to be designed for them. If you really want to make a website that will stand the test of time and be accessible to the highest number of viewers, plan on making different versions of your site for different devices, or plan to use a responsive design that adjusts as necessary.

10. Building Your Website

1. Decide what method or tool you'll use to build it. When you have the basic idea down and have a plan for how it will be laid out, the next to think about is how you're going to build it. The options seem endless, and people will try to sell you this or that 'fantastic' application, and every other thing that you "absolutely must have" on your site, however the reality is that there are a few great tools for building websites, and one of them will be best-suited to your situation and needs.

2. Build it yourself. This is the first option. If you have a website-building application like Adobe Dreamweaver, it is not very difficult to create a website from scratch. You might need to do some coding but don't panic! HTML looks complicated, but it's like listening to Shakespeare—it's hard at first, but once you get the feel of it, it's not that difficult.

Pros: website design software simplifies the process of building sites by letting you drag-and-drop images, text, buttons, movies, and anything else you can think of, usually without ever having to dig into HTML. Many web design applications will even let you create sites specifically for your smart phone or pad. If you are building a basic, personal website, this is really a great way to go.

Cons: there is a learning curve, and though you don''t have to dig into HTML, it's not totally geek-free. If you are in a hurry, this might not be the best solution. Perhaps the biggest con, though, is that if you are not a graphic designer, you could end up with a page that hurts the eyes. To mollify this somewhat, there are a number of free templates in the applications, and on the internet, but be aware of your limitations—if you have any!

3. Use a content management system (CMS). This is the second option. WordPress is an example of a great option for building websites. It helps you create web pages and blog posts quickly and easily, set up the menus, allow and manage user comments, and has thousands of themes and plugins that you can choose from and use for free. Drupal and Joomla are other great CMS options. Once the CMS is hosted, you can manage your site from anywhere (in the world) that has an Internet connection.

Pros: Very easy to use, quick to get started with one click install, and lots of options for the beginner (with enough depth for more experienced users).

Cons: Some themes are limiting, and not all are free.

4. Build the website from scratch. This is the third option. If you decide to build your website from scratch, you'll need to start using HTML and CSS. There are ways to extend your HTML skills and add more features and more depth to your website. If you are developing a professional website, these tools will help you get that edge that is needed in any business venture.

- CSS, which stands for "Cascading Style Sheets". CSS gives more flexibility for styling the HTML, and makes it much easier to make basic changes—fonts, headers, color schemes—in one place, and have those changes ripple through the site.

- XHTML is a web language set by W3C's standards. Almost identical to HTML, it follows a stricter set of rules for marking up information. What this means, for the most part, is minor changes to the way you write code.

- Look into HTML5. It's the fifth revision of the core HTML standard, and will eventually subsume the current version of HTML (HTML4), and XHTML as well.

- Learn a client-side scripting language, such as JavaScript. This will increase your ability to add interactive elements to your site, such as charts, maps, etc.

- Learn a server-side scripting language. PHP, ASP with JavaScript or VB Script or Python can be used to change the way web pages appear to different people, and lets you edit or create forums. They can also help store information about people who visit your site, like their username, settings, and even temporary "shopping carts" for commercial sites.

- AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a technique of using a browser sided language and a server sided language to make the page get new information from the server without refreshing the page, often greatly reducing user wait time and vastly improving the user's experience but increasing bandwidth usage. For a website that will see a lot of traffic, or an eCommerce site, this is an excellent solution.

5. Hire a professional. This is the fourth and final option. If you are not up to designing your own website, or learning new coding languages—especially for more advanced sites—hiring a professional may be your best option. Before you hire, ask to see a portfolio of their work, and check their references carefully.

11. Test Driving Your Website and Going Live

1. Register your domain name. If you’re on a budget, there are strategies for buying a cheap domain name. Find a domain name that is easy to remember and easy to spell. If you use domains ending with .com, you will end up with more traffic, but most of the easy ones are taken, so be creative!

Look to Network Solutions, GoDaddy, or Register.com are good in US and uk2.net if you're in the UK to research and find the ideal domain name for your website. Wordpress also includes a feature whereby you can use a name that's tagged with their site, for example, mywebsite.wordpress.com. But if the name you choose is also available as a .com, they will notify you when you sign up.

You can purchase domain names if they have been "parked" or are for sale online through business sales sites. It's a good idea to get legal and financial advice before purchasing an expensive domain name.

2. Inspect your website. Before you post your site, it's wise to test it thoroughly. Most web design software has a way to test your site without taking it online. Look for missing tags, broken links, search engine optimization, and website design flaws. These are all factors which may affect your website's traffic and revenues. You may also generate a free full-functioning site map to submit to search engines like Google, in a matter of minutes.

3. Test your website. When you finish your website, do usability testing. You can do this by asking a few friends or family members to try it out. Give them a specific task like "edit your profile" or "buy an alpaca sweater from the bargains page." Sit behind them and watch them navigate—do not help them. You will likely find areas where you need to improve navigation or clarify some instructions. Alternately use something like zurb.com to user test on specific demographics for different types of engagement. When testing a website in 2014 it's becoming important to keep the platform in mind and make sure the website is usable from smartphones and tablets as well as desktops.

Keep a list of things you notice that seem difficult or non-intuitive for the user.

4. Launch it! Choose a web host and upload your website. Your web host may have an FTP feature, or you can download your own FTP program like FileZilla or CyberDuck. If you hired a professional to design the website, they should be able to take care of this for you (but it still pays to ask questions so that you understand what is happening).

Note that there are ways to host your own website for free.

12. Website Considerations

1. Narrow down your concept. If you're doing this for money, which ideas stand to make the most profit? Which ideas require the most commitment? Which ideas look like they'd be fun to pursue? You will be spending time working on your website, so choose the idea you are most passionate about (that is also profitable and practical for you).

Define your goals, and work to achieve them. The website you create may be for fun, it may be for profit, or some combination of the two. Knowing your expectations makes it much easier both to design your website, and to track and make sense of the results.

2. Be ready for competition. Content sites require less investment but they also face more competition, since anyone can start a content site. To make money from this kind of site, you provide information and generate income from the traffic you receive through advertising, such as through Google AdSense. In order to optimize AdSense, you will have to write your content purposefully and make it interesting so that people come to your site. Use specific keywords directed at people searching for specific terms too; just don't get carried away with this aspect or the content may suffer and readers won't like it.

3. Be ready for responsibility. eCommerce sites, which sell products, will need more maintenance and attention. You will need to think about shipping, sales, taxes, SSL, inventory updates, and everything that a person with a brick-and-mortar storefront would have to manage. A system for prompt answering of questions and dealing with complaints is essential when selling products online; many companies also offer phone help, which you can outsource offshore if need be.

If the goal is just to add a stream of income, you can also sell other people's products through affiliate programs, letting you earn money without investing in product or worrying about shipping.

4. Know the audience or market you want to reach. Which kinds of people will your website serve? Conduct market research to figure out more about your audience. Things to know or find out include: What do they do? How old are they? What are their other interests? All of this information can help make your website much more useful. However, be careful of assuming that your site is only targeting one group––always watch for trends that show other types of people becoming interested, so that you can cater for their interests too and make the most of new opportunities.

5. Do keyword research. This is necessary to determine whether people are searching for topics that are relevant to your site and can be useful for learning more about your potential clients. Making a conscious effort to incorporate in-demand keywords into the site can also help you get a better search engine ranking. There are tools available from Google (ex. google.com/trends/ and google.com/insights/search/#), Overture, and third-party software developers that can make the keyword research process easier.

Sprinkle the keywords you've chosen throughout your text, but not insofar as it hurts the quality of your content.

Creating pages that are optimized for the search engines will help you get your site found which is really more important than design. What good is a site that no one sees?

6. Advertise. Now that it's out there, you want people to come, so let them know!

- Submit your site to major search engines. There are sites that will do this for you, or you can do it yourself.

- Tell your friends. Tweet about it—constantly! Add it to your Facebook status updates, post pictures of it on Flickr, add it to your LinkedIn account—anywhere and everywhere is the key here. The more people coming to your site, the better.

- Use an e-mail address with your domain. Visit other websites that complement (not compete with) yours, and offer to exchange links or guest blog/write. Post constructively on blogs and forums, and put your URL in your signature.

- Use article marketing. Creating SEO-optimized articles and posting them to other sites is a sometimes a useful way to create back-links to your website. This might help you to boost your website’s search engine ranking but always keep abreast of search engine updates that often impact SEO strategies and can render them less helpful or even downgrade your site's ranking.

7. Provide quality content and service. Most of all, listen to your readers and customers and learn from their experience with your website.

Take constructive comments seriously. Other band members, fans, and friends may all have easier navigation ideas.

Think about your target market or audience: their needs, their frustrations, their circumstances. As much as possible, seek to make their lives easier or more informed.

13. Tips

  • People are often in a hurry. On average, you have about 3-7 seconds to capture people's eyeballs, so be smart about what people see first when they get to your page. To minimize your load time, don't overload with huge graphics. Compress them where possible. Use flashy technology JavaScript, Flash, Streaming Audio/Video, etc., sparingly and only if it is important to your presentation.
  • If you're selling a product that users will find through a search engine, make sure that product is the first thing they see when they get to your page. The more you make your visitor click, the more likely your visitor will visit someplace else.
  • If you hire a professional to code a complicated site, remember that programmers are not necessarily graphic designers. The most eye-catching sites out there have been made by or with the input of someone involved in graphic design. The best advice, especially for a professional site, is to use the right team for the job: designers design the look and feel of the site; programmers do all the stuff under the hood to make it work; marketers position the site and make sure it's relevant; and writers write the copy.
  • Find popular websites, even if they do not have much to do with yours, and use them as models. What are they doing right? What is interesting about their layout, their content, the way you maneuver through the website? Incorporate relevant aspects of what you learn from viewing these sites into your own website, tailoring it to fit your requirements.
  • Begin with simple things, practice them, and then find ways to improve – even if what you create is not very impressive the first few times time. Do not attempt to rush through the process. If you intend to sell a product on your website, you will need to be able to accept secure credit card payments. You can apply for a merchant account, which charges a per-transaction fee, or use a free payment service like PayPal. Always read the fine print carefully. Be aware that many credit facilities require you to give guarantees for lost or damaged shipped items (look into insurance as well).

  • Warnings

  • Never violate your visitors'' trust. Respect their privacy. Spam, annoying pop-ups, and irrelevant ads will hurt your credibility. A clear privacy statement is one way to build your credibility. Provide a prominent link to your privacy statement from every page on the site as well as from any location that you are asking your visitors for personal information. Provide legitimate contact information online. If you need to use ads on your website, explain to your visitors why, and show them that you're doing your best to accommodate their visit. And mean it!
  • If you use content from another website, be it a picture, a JavaScript, or whatever, get permission and give them credit for it. If you do not, they might sue you. Remember, never delete the details (username, password, etc.) of your account. If you do not have the details when you forget them, you will not be able to work on your website again. More importantly, never give out your details (except for your website address).
  • Be careful not to obsess too much about all the "latest advice" on marketing websites. While some of the advice is useful and sound, a lot of it is not. Marketing is not a science––it's an ongoing, ever-changing experiment. You are the best judge for how your own promotional strategies are working (or not). Listening to users and learning from their experience is the most valid approach of all.

Question list

  1. What it is mean "Web-site"? Definition "Web-site".
  2. How does website work?
  3. What can You say about static website?
  4. What can You say about dynamic website?
  5. What can You say about Web development?
  6. What do You know about Web development tools? How and which Web development tools do You use?
  7. What do You think "- Is it difficult to built website in our time?" Why easy or not?
  8. What is a Website Builder?
  9. Who are website builders for?
  10. Different types of website builders.
  11. What do you know about Integrated development environment ( IDE )?
  12. Do You have your own website? If you have got one what about is it?
  13. What do You know about website creating? (Build it yourself, CMS or hire professional). What do you use or what do you prefer?
  14. Pros and cons, a shortening of the Latin expression "pro et contra" (for and against)

  15. Share with us about Pros and Cons (for and against) when user build website yourself
  16. Share with us about Pros and Cons (for and against) when user use CMS
  17. Share with us about Pros and Cons (for and against) when user hire professional
  18. Share with us Your opinion about "Main items(elements) that need to make a website"
  19. How to test a website?
  20. What do You know about website SEO?
  21. Which technologies do You use when you build website?
  22. Whats mean "html", "css", "php", "javascript", "jQuery", "MySQLi"; what else do You use in your project's?

task 2

Translate to English

  1. Я розробив скрипт.
  2. Я розробляю скрипт.
  3. Я розроблю скрипт.

  4. Ми створили веб-проект.
  5. Ми створюємо веб-проект.
  6. Ми створимо веб-проект.

  7. Я знаю як працює код.
  8. Я взнаю як працює код.

  9. Ми розробили дизайн вебсайту.
  10. Ми розробляємо дизайни вебсайту.
  11. Ми розробимо дизайн вебсайту.

  12. Я знаю мови програмування PHP, javascript.
  13. Я вивчаю мови програмування PHP, javascript.
  14. Я вивчу мову програмування PHP, javascript.

  15. Я розробив веб-проект за три дні.
  16. Я розроблю веб-проект за три дні.

  17. Створити сайт досить легко, як варіант можна застосувати систему управління контентом.
  18. Розробити стильний дизайн веб-сайту потребує деяких зусиль.
  19. PHP - серверна мова програмування.
  20. javascript - мова програмування на стороні клієнта.
  21. Під час розробки веб-сайту варто зважати на веб-безпеку.
  22. На сьогоднішній день розроблено 75% веб-проекту.
programist

- Thats all for this lecture!



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